FIND A JOB.COM

Noshua Watson, graduate student in Econ at Stanford, tells you how to find a job online.

A solid resume does you no good without an abundant source of job listings to which you can apply. Job Search Engines are a effective tool for research on what jobs and positions are available. Snagging your next job online is easy if you know how to point and click.

You must have a paper resume, carefully proofread and edited. But to do your job search over the web, you need to save your resume in ASCII or text format. You also need to make crucial changes to your resume's layout.

Your electronic resume should be simple and readable, not pretty. Any bullets or symbols need to be replaced with dashes. Highlight previously bold text by using all capital letters. Last, take out any columns or tabs you used to format the paper resume. As consolation for destroying your visions of artistic resume glory, you can add a few extra lines over the one page format recommended for entry-level resumes since no one will notice.

Job search engines are the first stop for the clueless and those who already know which industries and companies they prefer. On most sites, you establish an account which posts your resume and takes note of your personal information and job search preferences. Once you've opened an account, you just need to cut and paste your ASCII text resume into the box they provide.

You can apply online by clicking on the job listings you like. Even if you don't have an account, many sites still allow you to search their job listings. The listings also include information on how to apply by e-mail, snail mail or fax.

If you establish accounts at more than one website, use the same login name and password, unless you're extremely concerned about security. Be sure to specify whether you want your resume posted for all employers to see or only jobs for which you apply. You wouldn't want your resume to come up if your current employer searches the database of available resumes. You also don't want to receive e-mails from recruiting firms that charge $100 or more to circulate your resume. Finally, be sure the website's services are free.

Many of the job search engines have advanced features like job agents and job seeking advice chat rooms. The job agents reduce the tedium of checking for new listings. After you enter your job location and job title/field preference, the job agent e-mails you each time new listings are posted. The chat rooms allow you to blow off steam, talking with other jobseekers.

The most knowledgeable job hunters can use a general search engine like Yahoo! or Excite to find jobs with small and large companies within a certain industry. Most companies have websites and pages on their websites titled "Employment", "Work for Us", or "Contact Us". You can use a general search engine like Yahoo! or Excite to find jobs with small and large companies within a certain industry. Most companies have websites and pages on their websites titled "Employment", "Work for Us", or "Contact Us".


JOB SEARCH ENGINE WEB SITES
 
General

http://www.careermosaic.com
http://www.careerpath.com
http://careers.wsj.com
http://www.hotjobs.com
http://www.jobdirect.com
http://www.jobweb.org/catapult/choice.htm
http://monster.com
 
College/Entry Level

http://www.jobtrak.com
You need to contact the career center at your undergraduate educational institution to get the password to use this site.
 
Temporary Positions

http://www.acareer.com
A link to Interim, a temporary job to permanent placement agency.
 
Non-Profit/Government Jobs

http://www.idealist.org
A search engine for jobs in the non-profit and social services sectors.
 
http://www.usajobs.opm.gov
Listings for every federal job opening, through the Office of Personnel Management
 
More Job Search Engines

http://www.managementjobs.com
Select the industry or type of job you want and get a list of twenty or more websites you can search for those types of jobs.



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